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Cardamom Orange Krumkake recipe

Cardamom Orange Krumkake recipe

  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Biscuits and cookies
  • Fruit biscuits and cookies

Krumkake are Norwegian waffle biscuits. The krumkake turned out nicely crisp with a nice orange spice flavour.

8 people made this

IngredientsServes: 30

  • 200g plain flour
  • 2 teaspoons ground cardamom
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 200g caster sugar
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons grated orange zest
  • 75g butter, softened
  • 160ml single cream
  • 2 eggs

MethodPrep:15min ›Cook:45min ›Ready in:1hr

  1. Grease the krumkake iron with oil or vegetable spray. Heat iron over medium low heat. You should only need to grease the iron once. If using an electric krumkake iron, follow manufacturer's directions for preheating.
  2. Sift the flour, cardamom, ginger, cinnamon and nutmeg into a large bowl. Stir the sugar, salt, and orange zest into the flour mixture until evenly blended.
  3. Place the butter and single cream into a microwavable bowl. Cover and cook in microwave until warm, about 25 seconds. Cool slightly. Whisk the eggs, one at a time, into to the single cream mixture. Stir the cream mixture into the flour mixture until well blended.
  4. Using preheated krumkake iron, place 1 tablespoon of batter onto each krumkake mould, using a second spoon to scrape off the batter. Close the krumkake iron, and cook until the iron stops steaming and the cookies are golden brown, 30 to 60 seconds. Carefully peel the krumkakes from the iron and while still hot, and wrap around a wooden krumkake cone to make the traditional cone shape. Hold in place until set, about 10 seconds, remove and cool completely on greaseproof paper. Repeat with remaining batter.

Cook's note

My krumkake iron is electric and took a little over a minute to cook each one, but traditional irons will vary according to how hot it is.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(7)

Reviews in English (7)

by LAURIE K

WOW this is not your traditional krumkake. Great bold flavor. My electric iron took 20 to 30 seconds to cook. We definitely liked the pale ones best. I got 36 out of recipe. This will be a new tradition in our household.-08 Dec 2007

by mvm

These taste more spicy a few days later. We enjoyed them and I'm now working on just the right filling to go with the flavors. I used a pizzele iron-16 Jul 2010

by Ra

I would have rated this a 3, but my husband couldn't stop eating them, and my coworkers really enjoyed them. Not to mention I'm sure this is a much more interesting flavor than the original Krumkake. It was a bit heavy on the orange and cardamom, I'd suggest reducing those amounts if you don't want the flavors too strong.-28 Apr 2009


Norwegian Brown Sugar Butter Cookies with Cardamom & Black Pepper

Preparing festive cookies and sharing them with neighbors and friends is an important and long traditional role in the holiday celebrations up here in Petersburg. Many of the favorites around town krumkake, shortbread, and spritz, are rooted in simple classic Norwegian baking ingredients—butter, sugar, eggs, and sweet warming spices such as cardamom, ginger, and cinnamon. Baking and creating in the galley of the Northern Song this month, Chef Therese has crafted this simple, versatile, and delicious slice and bake cookie recipe. The dough can be made and formed ahead, refrigerated, or frozen, and baked on demand. They are also sturdy and are perfect for gift giving and mailing to others who are…home for the holidays!

INGREDIENTS

1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, cut into cubes
1/3 cup packed light brown sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon orange flower water (optional)
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
3/4 cup all-purpose flour
3 tablespoons cornstarch
1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom
a few grinds of black pepper (about 1/4 teaspoon)

DIRECTIONS

Prepare dough:
Add the butter, brown sugar, vanilla extract, orange flower water (if using), and the salt to a food processor fitted with the metal blade.

Blend the ingredients until they are well combined and become a light fluffy paste.

Combine the flour, cornstarch, ground cardamom and black pepper in a medium bowl, stirring well.

Add the flour mix to the butter mixture in the food process and pulse the mixture until the dough begins to clump together.

Dump the mixture back into the medium bowl and form into a rough ball, kneading a bit as necessary to bring together.

For round slice & bake cookies: Shape the soft dough into a log about 1½ inches wide, roll log up in plastic wrap and roll on the counter a few times to even the shape. Refrigerate until firm, at least one hour. Alternatively, you can refrigerate the dough up to 2 weeks or freeze for 2 months.

To bake: Preheat oven to 325 F.

Using a thin knife, slice the chilled log into ⅛ inch thick slices and arrange on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper.

Bake in the middle of the oven about 15 to 20 minutes, or until tops are firm and edges lightly brown.

For Shortbread -style wedges or squares (can be baked immediately):
Press or roll the dough onto the bottom of a (lightly floured) tart pan. Alternatively, roll out onto parchment paper and place in square pan. With the tines of a fork, prick the dough a few times to prevent bubbles.

To bake, preheat oven to 325F, bake 20-30 minutes, or until faintly brown. Immediately cut into wedges or squares.

Note:
If you don’t have a food processor or a stand mixer, or just want a simpler method, melt the butter (or even brown it for more flavor) whisk it well with the brown sugar and proceed. The cookies will come out less tender, but chewier and still delicious!


Yummy Recipes

Cook until browned approximately 30 seconds. To prepare iron for use.



Electric Krumkake Iron The Wooden Spoon



Krumkake Recipe A Delicious Cardamom Cookie Tikkido Com



Krumkake Norwegian Holiday Cookies Unicorns In The Kitchen

Alternately heat both sides of the iron until water sprinkled inside sizzles.




Krumkake recipe for electric iron.

Pour one tbsp of the.
12 cup white sugar.
Grease inside of plates when making the first few cookies.

While warm roll into a cone shape.
Add sugar butter and cardamom or anise.
1 scant cup of flour.

Place a teaspoon of the batter on the preheated iron and press together.
Ingredients 12 cup butter room temperature.
12 teaspoon freshly ground cardamom.

Add flour and mix until fully combined.
Add the eggs one at a time and mix well using a spoon.
You can also use an electric krumkake or pizzelle iron.

Add flour and milk beat until smooth.
Cream together the butter and sugar in a bowl.
Onto ungreased medium heat preheated krumkake iron find at specialty stores for about65.

Lemon or vanilla extract or cardomom flavoring if desired.
Spoon approximately 1 t.
Close the iron and heat over a medium to medium high burner just until a drop of water sizzles on the surface.

Pour a spoonful of batter onto preheated iron and press together.
6 oz melted butter.
Mix all ingredients together.

351 krumkake baker bethany housewares inc automatic electric iron bakes two 5 crispy wafer thin krumkakes quickly easily effortlessly in 60 seconds.
Open the iron and coat it with non stick spray.
Directions heat krumkake iron on stove over medium heat.

Heat control thermostat prevents over heating and maintains constant baking temperature indicator light tells you when to start.
Place iron directly over medium heat on top of stove.
Heat krumkake iron over medium heat.

Put the krumkake iron over medium heat and let it get hot.
You want to prevent damage to the iron and to keep the cookies from scorching so do not heat at the highest setting.
Add melted butter water and mix again.

Bubble waffle maker electric non stick hong kong egg waffler iron griddle ready in under 5 minutes free recipe guide included 38 out of 5 stars 361 3795 37.
00 cook about 1minute flip cook another 30 seconds until lightly golden brown.
Lightly grease the two sides of a stovetop krumkake iron with cooking spray or melted butter.

Instructions beat eggs and sugar with mixer for 5 minutes until creamy and light.
Sugar between 12 to 34 cup.


I love working with sugar cookie dough and creating a variety of shapes and sizes for my custom orders. My master sugar cookie recipe makes cookies that are wonderfully crispy with a slightly tender center and amazing flavor, thanks to the addition of pure almond extract.

Over the next few weeks I will be playing with different flavors of sugar cookies to see what I can add to my repertoire. I will be testing recipes for strawberry, red velvet, chocolate and cardamom-orange spice sugar cookies and would love to know: which one would you choose?

Keep an eye on your emails from SarahBakes next week, because I will be launching our first giveaway of 2021 with a chance to win one dozen custom decorated sugar cookies! I am so excited about this contest and hope you will join me in the fun. Seriously, there is hardly anything better than being surrounded by beautiful cookies.


Krumkake (Scandinavian Crisp Cookies), Gluten-Free

Greetings, all! I hope everyone who celebrates Christmas had a wonderful day! And those of you who celebrate Kwanza, Happy Kwanza!

Today’s cookie is something I’ve been dying to make for awhile. This is actually a traditional Christmas cookie, but I ended up not having time to make these before Christmas. I think I told you in my previous posts that earlier in the month I had asked on Twitter what people’s favorite Christmas cookies were. One of the answers I got was krumkake, which is a Scandinavian crisp cookie.

I love the concept of these cookies because you make them on a special krumkake iron (I know, all the irons for these Scandinavian cookies) and then roll them into pretty cones. The iron for these cookies is more like a fancy waffle iron. I got an electric one for Christmas, but the traditional ones are designed to be used on the stove. They all have a pretty design that gets imprinted on the krumkake when you use them. I have no experience with the stove-top irons, but my electric one is awesome! As far as I can tell, you can probably use this iron for pizzelles, the Italian Christmas cookies (even though the recipe would be different). I looked online for pizzelle makers, and it looks like they have different design for the imprint but otherwise work on the the same principles as krumkake makers.

To make krumkake, you place a blob of dough in the iron and squish the cover on top of it. This makes a flat krumkake:

As soon as the krumkake has cooked, you quickly remove it from the iron and then immediately use a cone roller:to shape them into cones. Luckily, a cone roller came with my iron–yay! I have to say, it’s so fun to make these! And they are surprisingly easy to make and to roll.

After the cones are cooled, you fill them. It’s my understanding that in Norway and Sweden, it’s traditional to fill the cones with whipped cream mixed with cloudberry jam. I got my cloudberry jam at Ikea. You can also order it online. You can also fill them with whatever you want to–plain whipped cream would be awesome. And I also want to try chocolate whipped cream. Mmmm. They also quite tasty on their own, so you can just eat them plain like a cookie.

You can use a pastry bag and fancy tip to fill the cones. Or you can use a gizmo like this, which does the same thing. Or you can just spoon the cream into the krumkake. Regardless of the way you get the cream into the krumkake, they taste delicious!

Because of their cone shape, I’m thinking these might be great as ice cream cones. I haven’t tried that yet, but I intend to do so soon! For anyone who wants to try this idea before I do, what I would do is put a blob of chocolate in the bottom of the cone and let it harden. Then place the ice cream in the cone–with the idea that the chocolate would stop the melting ice cream from dripping out of the bottom of the cone.

Krumkake (Scandinavian Crisp Cookies), Gluten-Free
-adapted from The Great Scandinavian Baking Book, Beatrice Ojakangas
-makes around 20 krumkake

Special Equipment Needed
-hand mixer
krumkake iron

Note: this recipe uses my gf flour mix, Jeanne’s Gluten-Free All-Purpose Flour Mix (mix together and store in a cool, dark place):
1 1/4 C (170g) brown rice flour
1 1/4 C (205g) white rice flour
1 C (120g) tapioca flour
1 C (165g) sweet rice flour (also known as Mochiko or glutinous rice flour)
2 scant tsp. xanthan gum
(you can also use the gluten-free flour mixture (not baking mix) of your choice–just be sure it contains xanthan gum. Or, you can add 1/4 tsp. xanthan gum per cup of gluten-free flour. If you use bean flour, it will add a bean taste to the cookies)

Ingredients
1 C (200g) granulated sugar
1/2 C (1 stick 4 oz 115g) unsalted butter (or butter substitute), softened
2 large or extra large eggs
1 C (235ml) milk (or milk substitute)
1 tsp vanilla extract
1 1/2 C (210g) Jeanne’s Gluten-Free All-Purpose Flour Mix
Neutral flavored oil for the iron (Rice Bran Oil)
For the filling: whipped cream and jam of your choice, mixed together

In a medium bowl, cream together sugar and butter until fluffy. Add the vanilla extract and beat until blended. Add the eggs, one at a time, and beat until mixture is light and fluffy. Beginning and ending with the flour, add the flour and the milk, alternating between the two. Beat until mixture is smooth–a few seconds.

Preheat the krumkake iron. If you have an electric iron, preheat it to the 2.5 darkness level. Brush the iron with a bit of vegetable oil. You will probably only need to brush the iron with oil for the first krumkake of the day–see how your iron behaves and brush with oil accordingly.

When iron is ready, place a heaping tablespoon of batter in the middle and close top. Let cook for 60-70 seconds. You will need to make a few in order to find out the optimal cooking time for your iron. Once cooked, remove the cookie from iron onto a plate or cookie sheet and quickly roll around roller cone. Let sit for a minute or two until the cookie has cooled into the cone shape. Remove cone.

Repeat process with the rest of the batter. Let the cookies cool completely–they will crisp as they cool.

Immediately before serving, fill with your choice of filling. We like to mix unsweetened whipped cream with a some cloudberry jam (or other jam) for the filling. Also, the krumkake can be made ahead of time and stored in an airtight container, unfilled, until needed. Don’t store these filled, as the krumkake will become soggy.


Whole vs. Ground

Recipes using black cardamom often call for using the whole pod, with the seeds intact. The pods are then discarded after cooking is done as chomping into the whole pod is unpleasant.

If you're using green cardamom in a recipe, ideally you'd start with whole cardamom pods. If you buy ground cardamom (i.e. cardamom powder) from the spice section, it won't be as flavorful since the essential oils of the cardamom seed will lose their flavor relatively quickly after the seeds are ground.


(Never) Too Many Cooks

When my husband, who is part Norwegian, first introduced me to krumkake, I thought I had died and gone to heaven. This delicious little waffle cookie —slightly similar to Italian pizelle cookies but with a much more delicate flavor and texture— is a traditional holiday staple in my husband's family. What sets krumkake apart from other waffle cookies is that it's made using cardamom and the flour is sifted so it's super-fine which helps to give the batter a nice light consistency. The batter is then cooked on a special griddle engraved with beautiful designs. If you don't own one, you can easily purchase one for around forty dollars, or you can simply cook them in a small crepe/sautee pan or flat griddle. The batter will spread as it heats and you can flip them with a spatula for sort of crunchy wafers. You won't have the pretty lacey pattern but you'll still have the yummy treats!

These delectable little babies are so light and delicate, so beautiful and so tasty I could eat, ahem, well, let's just say. a lot. My husband has made krumkake for many, many years using his grandmother's original recipe which uses wheat flour. Ever since I started eating gluten free (and casein free in many cases for my son's sake), I've missed having krumkake at Christmas. We decided to remedy that this year and set out to modify Grandma's recipe. Which, ahem, it turns out is packed away with some other cookbooks in my mother's attic. (Did I mention my kitchen is tiny? I'm sure I did.)

The recipe below comes from LefseStore we substituted a GF flour blend for the regular flour but split the difference on casein by using butter and rice milk. We were so pleased with this recipe that we'll use it again and substitute something else for the butter, perhaps coconut butter or palm shortening.

The basic recipe (with GF or CF substitutions in parenthesis after):

2 eggs
1 cup sugar
1/2 cup butter, softened (not melted) (coconut butter or palm shortening)
1 tsp ground cardamom
1 1/2 cup flour, sifted (GF sorghum blend, recipe at the end of this post)**
1 scant cup milk (rice milk)
1 pinch salt (moderate) (not in the original recipe but my husband remembered that from Grandma's)
**1/4 tsp xanthan gum (omit if using regular flour)

Beat the eggs well. Add sugar, butter and cardamom, beat well.
Add flour and milk in equal parts at a time and beat until smooth. (Confession: I tossed the flour and milk in together in my Kitchenaid stand mixer and it was fine. If you are mixing by hand you should definitely follow the recipe's instructions.) The key is not to overmix the flour too much can make the final product more coarse than you want.

Using a tablespoon or large mixing spoon, spoon the batter onto the griddle just behind the center of the design. When the lid is closed, the weight of it will push the batter forward to fill in the design. Cook for about a minute and check for doneness. The cookies are done when they are a light golden color and the pattern is just discernable. Use a wooden or synthetic spatula (for non-stick cookware) to lift the edge of the cookie off the griddle while rolling it. Tradition calls for rolling them, while still hot, around a cone-shaped form. If you don't have a cone form it's perfectly fine to use a round handled whisk or a broom stick. Or simply lay them flat to cool.

Honesty clause: We haven't made any of these yet this season because our young son has been battling some significant respiratory illnesses for the past month— but we plan to remedy that this weekend. The pictures accompanying this post are from other sources (attributed).


NK NEIGHBORS: Norwegian recipes

CORRECTION: An ingredient in the recipe for Krum Kake as originally published was incorrect. The ingredient is cardamon, not cinnamon.

11D2 cups granulated sugar

2 to 3 teaspoons cardamom

Bring butter to room temperature and work in sugar by hand. Add the eggs. Combine flour and cardamom and add gradually, mixing until dough is no longer sticky.

Refrigerate for an hour or more. When dough is workable, press dough into forms, rotating form as you press lightly with fingers.

Bake at 375 degrees about 12 to 15 minutes or until lightly browned. Store in airtight container. Makes 75 to 80 cookies.

1 cup cornstarch or flour

Vegetable oil in deep fat fryer

Beat eggs slightly, add other ingredients and mix. Do not overbeat. Heat Rosette iron in hot fat and dip into batter, being careful not to let the batter run over the form. Dip the iron with the batter sticking to it into the fat and cook until slightly browned.

Tips: If the rosettes do not come off the iron easily, they have not been fried enough. If they have blisters, the eggs have been beaten too much, and if they drop off into the fat, the iron is not deep enough into the fat. If the batter slips off the iron, the iron is too hot, and if they are not crisp, they've been fried too quickly.

4 pounds peeled potatoes, boiled in salted water

2 heaping serving spoons of shortening

After the potatoes are cooked, drain thoroughly and rice them. Place them into a large bowl, add shortening and flour, working the dough until it is stiff but still pliable. It should be stiffer than pie dough, but not as stiff as bread dough.

Divide dough into small balls and roll out into 12-inch circles. Roll as thinly as possible, then place on a grill heated to 450 degrees. Cook until lightly browned, turn over with lefse stick and finish cooking. Serve warm.

3/4 pound powered sugar (1 7/8 cups)

4 hard cooked egg yolks, mashed

Cream butter and sugar. Add beaten raw egg yolks and cooked mashed egg yolks, cream and dry ingredients. Knead dough thoroughly, adding more flour if necessary. Break off small pieces of dough, roll into pencil-thin strips about 4 inches long and shape into wreaths. Dip wreaths into unbeaten egg white, then into coarsely chopped sugar (use sugar cubes). Place on cookie sheet and bake at 350 degrees until lightly browned. Makes about 10 dozen.

1 tablespoon melted butter

Beat eggs well add sugar and cream. Beat thoroughly and add dry ingredients, sifted together, and melted butter.

Heat Krumkake iron, butter the grid and place a teaspoon of batter on the iron. Close the iron and cook 1 to 2 minutes, depending on the heat of the iron. Use a knife to remove and wrap quickly into a cone shape, using a wooden dowel included with the Krumkake Iron.

2 teaspoons almond extract

Bring butter to room temperature and work in sugar with hands. Add eggs, a little salt, almond extract and flour. Refrigerate. Fill cookie press and turn out onto cookie sheet. Bake at 375 degrees for about 10 minutes or until lightly browned. Store in container. Makes 60 to 70 large cookies.

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SANDBAKKELS 1 pound butter 11Ú2 cups granulated sugar 3 egg yolks 2 egg whites 5 cups flour 2 to 3 teaspoons cardamom Bring butter to room temperature and work in sugar by hand. Add the eggs. Combine flour and cardamom and add gradually, mixing until dough is no longer sticky. . [Read More. ]

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Spice up Valentine's Day by giving cookies laced with exotic spices from around the world. Spices carry a rich history -- wars have been fought over them, explorers have traveled the seven seas in search of them, and entire economies have been built . [Read More. ]

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Blueberry Streusel Coffee Cake 2 1/2 cup flour 3/4 cup sugar 1 teaspoon packed brown sugar 1/2 tsp salt 3/4 cup cooking oil 1 1/4 cup buttermilk 1 large egg 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon water 1 cup frozen blueberries 1/2 cup chopped pecans 2 teaspoons cinnamon Grease 9-by-9-inch glass pan. Preheat oven to 325 degrees. . [Read More. ]


My Danish Kitchen

Back in 2005, Joe and I took a week long class at John C. Campbell Folk School. We were at the school during their Scandinavian Heritage week which we figured would be the ideal time for us to be at the school. Joe took a blacksmithing class and I took Scandinavian baking which was so much fun and gave me a lot of confidence in my baking skills. Campbell Folk School is located in the southern Appalachian mountains by Brasstown, North Carolina and the campus is set in the most beautiful and serene location. The school is based on the Danish concept of Folkehøjskole which is an adult non-competitive learning experience. Campbell Folk School offer a wide variety of classes based on American traditional arts and crafts such as basketry, dance, drawing, enameling, leather, metalwork, music, photography, woodworking and so much more. I have written about my experience at Campbell Folk School before when I made Wienerbrød and making these Norwegian Krumkaker brought back wonderful memories about our experience there. I can honestly say that is was one of the most rewarding, exciting and at the same time peaceful experiences I have ever had. To get a feel for the atmosphere at the Folk School check out their blog.

Me at John Campbell Folk School practicing decorating a delicious layered cake.

Krumkake is a delicate and delicious Norwegian waffle cookie which is traditionally served during the Christmas holiday. I first learned to make this classic waffle while taking my Scandinavian baking class at Campbell Folk School. Making the waffle does require an Krumkake iron and a cone shaped roller which can be purchased pretty easily these days online. The cookies can seem a little tricky to roll at first (careful, they are hot) but after a couple of cookies you’ll quickly get the hang of it. They can be rolled into a cone shape, a cylinder (by using the handle of a wooden spoon) or simply served as a flat round disc. The filling choices are numerous and only limited by your imagination but traditionally they are served with whipped cream and fresh berries.

Krumkake – makes 38 Krumkaker

Ingredients:

4 large eggs, at room temperature

2 tsp vanilla extract or 1/2 tsp ground cardamom

warm water to get correct batter consistency (I used 14 tbsp)

Special equipment required: Krumkake iron and a Krumkake roller (if not already included with your iron)

Melt butter and set aside. Add eggs and sugar to a bowl and beat on high until thick and pale yellow in color. While continuing to mix, pour the melted butter, in a thin stream, into the egg mixture. Add your choice of either vanilla extract or cardamom and while continuing to mix, add flour in small increments. If batter is too thick, add warm water to correct consistency.

Note: follow your Krumkake iron manufactures instructions regarding temperature settings, if iron needs to be greased and cooking time. Using the krumkake roller will give you a cone shape and using the end of a wooden spoon with give a cylinder shape.

Place a large piece of parchment paper onto your counter top next to the Krumkake iron. I taped the corners of the paper down to keep it from moving around.

Pour a generous tablespoon of batter onto your hot krumkake iron, close lid and cook until ready (30-45 seconds). Using a small offset spatula or a butter knife, quickly lift the soft krumkake onto the parchment paper and roll into desired shape. Keep the cookie on the roller for 1-2 minutes to allow it to take its shape before sliding the cookie off the roller and placing it onto a baking sheet to cool completely. Store cookies in an airtight tin until ready to serve. Fill cones with your favorite filling right before serving and enjoy.

Krumkake serving suggestions: whipped cream with fresh berries, soft ice cream, preserves or jams, pudding, custard or Carole’s Almond Pudding (recipe follows)

Carole’s Almond Pudding:

Ingredients:

1 small package instant vanilla pudding (95 gram or 3.4 oz.)

1 cup heavy whipping cream

1/4 – 1/2 tsp almond extract

Beat all ingredients together for 1-2 minutes until desired consistency and keep cool in refrigerator until ready to serve. Pipe into krumkaker cookies and serve immediately.

Source for Krumkake: adapted from Tine.no

Source for Carole’s Almond Pudding: my friend and coworker Carole Yoder


My Danish Kitchen

Back in 2005, Joe and I took a week long class at John C. Campbell Folk School. We were at the school during their Scandinavian Heritage week which we figured would be the ideal time for us to be at the school. Joe took a blacksmithing class and I took Scandinavian baking which was so much fun and gave me a lot of confidence in my baking skills. Campbell Folk School is located in the southern Appalachian mountains by Brasstown, North Carolina and the campus is set in the most beautiful and serene location. The school is based on the Danish concept of Folkehøjskole which is an adult non-competitive learning experience. Campbell Folk School offer a wide variety of classes based on American traditional arts and crafts such as basketry, dance, drawing, enameling, leather, metalwork, music, photography, woodworking and so much more. I have written about my experience at Campbell Folk School before when I made Wienerbrød and making these Norwegian Krumkaker brought back wonderful memories about our experience there. I can honestly say that is was one of the most rewarding, exciting and at the same time peaceful experiences I have ever had. To get a feel for the atmosphere at the Folk School check out their blog.

Me at John Campbell Folk School practicing decorating a delicious layered cake.

Krumkake is a delicate and delicious Norwegian waffle cookie which is traditionally served during the Christmas holiday. I first learned to make this classic waffle while taking my Scandinavian baking class at Campbell Folk School. Making the waffle does require an Krumkake iron and a cone shaped roller which can be purchased pretty easily these days online. The cookies can seem a little tricky to roll at first (careful, they are hot) but after a couple of cookies you’ll quickly get the hang of it. They can be rolled into a cone shape, a cylinder (by using the handle of a wooden spoon) or simply served as a flat round disc. The filling choices are numerous and only limited by your imagination but traditionally they are served with whipped cream and fresh berries.

Krumkake – makes 38 Krumkaker

Ingredients:

4 large eggs, at room temperature

2 tsp vanilla extract or 1/2 tsp ground cardamom

warm water to get correct batter consistency (I used 14 tbsp)

Special equipment required: Krumkake iron and a Krumkake roller (if not already included with your iron)

Melt butter and set aside. Add eggs and sugar to a bowl and beat on high until thick and pale yellow in color. While continuing to mix, pour the melted butter, in a thin stream, into the egg mixture. Add your choice of either vanilla extract or cardamom and while continuing to mix, add flour in small increments. If batter is too thick, add warm water to correct consistency.

Note: follow your Krumkake iron manufactures instructions regarding temperature settings, if iron needs to be greased and cooking time. Using the krumkake roller will give you a cone shape and using the end of a wooden spoon with give a cylinder shape.

Place a large piece of parchment paper onto your counter top next to the Krumkake iron. I taped the corners of the paper down to keep it from moving around.

Pour a generous tablespoon of batter onto your hot krumkake iron, close lid and cook until ready (30-45 seconds). Using a small offset spatula or a butter knife, quickly lift the soft krumkake onto the parchment paper and roll into desired shape. Keep the cookie on the roller for 1-2 minutes to allow it to take its shape before sliding the cookie off the roller and placing it onto a baking sheet to cool completely. Store cookies in an airtight tin until ready to serve. Fill cones with your favorite filling right before serving and enjoy.

Krumkake serving suggestions: whipped cream with fresh berries, soft ice cream, preserves or jams, pudding, custard or Carole’s Almond Pudding (recipe follows)

Carole’s Almond Pudding:

Ingredients:

1 small package instant vanilla pudding (95 gram or 3.4 oz.)

1 cup heavy whipping cream

1/4 – 1/2 tsp almond extract

Beat all ingredients together for 1-2 minutes until desired consistency and keep cool in refrigerator until ready to serve. Pipe into krumkaker cookies and serve immediately.

Source for Krumkake: adapted from Tine.no

Source for Carole’s Almond Pudding: my friend and coworker Carole Yoder


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